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The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

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The Appalachian

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Boone Town Council approves Greenway Skate Park

Boone+Town+Council+approves+Greenway+Skate+Park

The Boone Town Council unanimously moved to set aside land and funding to complete the Greenway Skate Park Thursday night.

The park will be located on the Greenway Trail near the former Watauga Humane Society building. The committee also received funding of $25,000 for the construction of the skate park’s concrete pad. According to the Cruzin’ Committee, skate parks in North Carolina cost between $250,000 and $1 million.

The town council adjusted the agenda of the meeting to allow for the Cruzin’ Committee presentation. The presentation at the meeting was given by John-Paul Pardy, owner of Recess Skate and Snow and chair of the Town of Boone Cruzin’ Committee. Pardy said that the next steps for the Cruzin’ Committee will be to work with the Town of Boone to prepare the land for the park. All construction of the features of the park will be done by Cruzin’ Committee members.

“My goal is to have the pad poured and ready to skateboard on by late spring,” Pardy said. “Once the pad is skateable we can get the features done, and it will be enjoyable soon after.”

Pardy and Jeannine Collins, former Boone Town Council member, founded The Cruzin’ Committee in September when Appalachian State University purchased the old Watauga High School property, which was the site of the Boone do-it-yourself Skate Park.

External Director of Affairs for Appalachian State Student Government Association Nicholas Williams was appointed to the initial Cruzin’ Committee. Williams said that the Cruzin’ Committee consists of a diverse range of members including students, business owners, parents, town and county officials, Appalachian State administration and other residents of Boone.

“While I’ve never lasted more than ten seconds on a skateboard, I have a lot of close friends and acquaintances that have been directly affected by the lack of skateboarding infrastructure in Boone,” Williams said via email. “I felt like addressing this matter was long-overdue.”

In Boone, skateboarding is restricted on public property, making skateboarding in most parts of the town and on the grounds of the university illegal. Williams said that the presence of the skate park in Boone will allow the skating community to strengthen their bonds without breaking any town ordinances. Williams said that his next goal is to continue to work with the committee to reduce restrictions against skateboarding in town and promote skateboarding as an alternate transportation source.

Story by Nora Smith, Graphics Editor

Featured photo by Nora Smith, Graphics Editor

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Nora Smith, Reporter
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