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The Appalachian

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The Appalachian

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Moretz wants to keep farmers informed on Soil and Water Conservation district supervisor

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The Appalachian Online

Lifelong farmer Bill Moretz is running to serve on the board that directly affects his trade, the Watauga County Soil and Water Conservation district supervisor.

Moretz was born in Boone and grew up self-reliant on a subsistence farm, growing enough food to feed his family with little surplus. After spending six years in the Navy he returned to run his family farm in 1989. Since then, Moretz has served on multiple agricultural boards, including the Watauga County Farmers’ Market Board and Watauga County Water and Sewer Study Committee.

One of the main issues in Watauga County is pollution from erosion, which can be caused by bad construction plans, Moretz said.

“Soil and Water acts as another check and balance,” Moretz said.

The supervisor position makes sure local projects are meeting necessary environmental criteria, Moretz said.

Moretz said he will keep other farmers in the community informed and aware of opportunities available from soil and water. Much of the board’s work is done in cooperation with local landowners.

“We’re also a mitigation board, if somebody feels that they were turned down for a project for personal bias, that’s where we come in,” Moretz said.

The Soil and Water Conservation Board promotes environmental conservation and works with the North Carolina Department of Agriculture to improve water quality and reduce point-source pollutions. Members are non-partisan and elected to four-year terms.

Moretz is running against Chris Hughes and Joey Clawson.

Story by Tommy Mozier 

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About the Contributor
Tommy Mozier, Senior Reporter
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