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The Appalachian

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Singer sets stage for solo artists with ‘Teen Age’

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The Appalachian Online

Last spring, apparel design and merchandising major Carly Witt recorded her album “Teen Age” with the help of students in the music industry studies department at Appalachian State University.

Several students collaborated on the project within App State’s own studios, including sophomore interdisciplinary studies major Georgia Golden.

“I spent four days in the Hayes School of Music’s studio recording my album,” Witt said, “[‘Teen Age’] was finally released just about a month ago onto iTunes, Spotify, Amazon Music, and several other websites. I am thrilled with how all my songs turned out.”

The album features seven tracks Witt wrote during high school and college, she said.

My album is called “Teen Age,” because I wrote it when I was a teenager but it’s also very relevant to teenagers. It deals with short instances that seem like a big deal at the time.”

The song “Home” is the first Witt wrote for the album, and focuses on her hometown in Virginia.

“[‘Home’] is about the town I grew up in and how I loved it, but I knew at some point I would leave. I just wanted to make sure the people who are my friends and family would always stick by me no matter where I lived.”

Many of the songs are love songs, said Witt. Golden described the album as “dreamlike.”

“[The album] gives a lot of attention to the parts of ourselves we often push away, like childhood, love and adolescence,” she said.

Witt previously played at Black Cat and Crossroads Coffee House, but reports a difficult music scene in Boone for a solo artist.

“Eventually I hope to form a band,” said Witt. “It’s hard as singer/songwriter here to perform at larger venues- it’s definitely about putting yourself out there. Other solo artists on campus are doing the same, but you don’t have that big fan base and that makes it harder to promote yourself, when you don’t have that big sound.”

Kickstarter.com, a fundraising site dedicated to personal projects with community return, helped Witt raise money to produce “Teen Age,” she said.

“My Kickstarter goal last year was $500 and I reached that in a few days,” Witt said. “There was a good amount of people I didn’t know who contributed and I think it was great that I took an interest.”

For the future, Witt hopes to create another album and personalize her style.

I need to find my select style,” said Witt. “I know what it is but as a solo artist it’s hard to know when I haven’t evolved past that. I’m planning to create another album in the next few years, by the time I’m a senior. For the future, I want a bigger sound, even if it’s hard to form a band when music is based on voice more so then
instruments.

Story by: Kelsey Hamm, A&E Editor

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