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The Appalachian

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The Appalachian

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The Appalachian

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APPS hosts roller skating event

APPS+hosts+roller+skating+event

Students were invited to relive their glory days at the Skate Thru the Decades event held by Appalachian Popular Programming Society on Friday.

The lights were dimmed, music played over the speakers and old music videos projected onto the walls as students skated in circles from 5:30-9 p.m.

“We were looking for something for free that you didn’t have to make that you could do on campus, and we don’t do a lot of late-night events,” Noni Alexander, APPS Special Events chairperson said. “So we asked ourselves, ‘What is something that everyone used to love to do?’ And that’s how we came up with roller skating.”

After signing a waiver, students were able to check out skates and begin skating.

The event, put on by the Special Events committee of APPS, was the first time APPS brought in a roller rink to campus.

“Roller skating is something a lot of people can do, no matter who you are,” Alexander said. “Even if you aren’t skating, that’s not the point. The point is to just have fun in a different way for free.”

Each hour of the event represented a decade, to which the music changed. Students skated through ’70s funk to late ’90s boy bands and more.

“I did a little bit of research and used some of my childhood memories to pick songs for the 2000s. There is Britney, there is Madonna, there is a little bit of everything,” said Alex Smith, who was in charge of picking out music for the final, 2000s-themed hour of the event.

For Tyler Piette, sophomore music industry studies major, the event served as a reminder of his childhood.

“The last time I skated was when I was 12,” Piette said. “I did this all throughout my childhood, so it is awesome to be able to do it again.”

Story: Casey Suglia, Intern A&E Reporter

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