The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

ASU police’s ‘Shots Fired’ program remains successful

ASU+police%E2%80%99s+%E2%80%98Shots+Fired%E2%80%99+program+remains+successful

The Appalachian State University Police Department offers a program called “Shots Fired: When Lightning Strikes,” aimed at educating students and faculty in the proper way to respond, should one find oneself in the middle of an active shooter situation.

Shotsfired_Web_2
Alan Beauvais | The Appalachian

University Police began offering this program in 2007, and Lt. KC Mitchell said in the five years he’s been presenting this program, it has been very well received by the many people who have seen it.

“This is an awareness program more than a checklist of things,” Mitchell said. “This program gives people the ideas to think about those situations and, if it did happen, to have a plan”.

While the likelihood of an active shooter appearing on campus is slim, the possibility must be acknowledged, Mitchell said. This program allows its viewers to not only avoid denial in such situations, but also to know what to do.

The program combines a video, created by the Center for Personal Protection and Safety, a private organization, and a presentation from Mitchell to get across its point. The video gives a general overview of different effective response techniques, which include “get out, hide out and take out”. These methods are explained and dramatized in the video.

“I show the video, we talk about the different key points, and then we have a question [and] answer session,” Mitchell said.

Many sections and departments of the university require their staff to either watch the video or attend the program. Mitchell said Plemmons Student Union employees and resident assistants are among those required to receive this program every year. This program is offered by request to organizations, clubs and classes and is also available online.

“The main thing I want for folks to take away from this program is the will to survive,” Mitchell said. “Refuse to be a victim.”

“The reality is an active shooter could appear anywhere,” Mitchell said. “The more educated and planned people are, the safer they will be.

Freshman Christopher Jones was required to watch this video for his freshman seminar class earlier this week.

“Although many of us received much of this information in high school, this program was definitely useful in both reinforcing the information we already had, and supplying more knowledge on the subject,” Jones said.

Jones admitted he had never really thought about the possibility of an active shooter appearing on Appalachian’s campus. This program, he said, made him acknowledge the possibility.

“Running and hiding probably would make sense to me in such a situation, but I never would have thought of fighting back, had I not seen this program,“ Jones said.

While Jones said he would recommend this program to others, he probably would not have watched it on his own time.

“It’s hard to find time in a busy schedule for something that isn’t required,” Jones said. “For this reason, I’m glad I was required to attend this program and hope this requirement is extended to other students.”

Story: Josh Wharton, Intern News Reporter

Photo: Alan Beauvais, Intern Photographer

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *