The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

Boone in Blossom brings first vibes of summer to festivalgoers from the area

Sophomore interdisciplinary studies major Molly Clay performs fire hooping Saturday night at Boone in Blossom. Boone in Blossom was held over the weekend at High Country Fairgrounds and included musical performances, workshops, meditation sessions and more. Olivia Wilkes | The Appalachian
Olivia Wilkes

Sophomore interdisciplinary studies major Molly Clay performs fire hooping Saturday night at Boone in Blossom. Boone in Blossom was held over the weekend at High Country Fairgrounds and included musical performances, workshops, meditation sessions and more.  Olivia Wilkes  |  The Appalachian
As summer festival season kicks off nation-wide with Coachella in California, Boone saluted the dawn of summer weather in its own way.

The fifth biannual Boone in Blossom music and arts festival, though a fraction of the size of Coachella, attracted 470 attendees who listened to live music at the main stage, participated in various workshops and wandered the transformed High Country Fairgrounds.

Musical headliners included singer Carly Taich and Boone-based bands Supatight, Donnie Dies and Cici & the Coronas Friday and Saturday night.

Boone residents and area business owners held workshops about partner yoga, worm composting, hula, the “birthing revolution” and herbal medicine on the main stage and festival grounds throughout the weekend.  Chanting and “static dancing” circles were led by festival organizers as well throughout the weekend.

Festivalgoers had the option to camp out and there were specific areas set up for families and general camping.

“There’s room to wander around,” said Christie Horowski, a sophomore sustainable development major. “You can do whatever you want to do; hooping, dancing, yoga, anything.” 

Horowski led a fire hooping demonstration Saturday night with a hula-hoop she made herself.

Area businesses, artists and craftspeople joined the fun and many brought goods with them to sell to festivalgoers.

A new food truck, Vitality, debuted its vegetarian and vegan fare at the festival.

Debi Golembieski, who owns and operates Green Mother Goods on King Street, created the Vitality food truck and came to the festival to oversee its debut.

“I’m really excited to be here and to be a part of this,” she said.  “It’s been a lovely fair. Good music, good people.”

Junior sociology major Erika Guerrero works at Green Mother Goods with Golembieski and came to the festival to help with the food truck debut. 

The festival really brought the community together, Guerrero said.

As is customary for events in Boone, in addition to the relaxed vibe and good music, keeping things local was a big theme for Boone in Blossom.

“I get the spirit of it,” said Elizabeth Penick, an Appalachian alumna. “Why buy something 1,000 miles away when you can buy it right here?”

Penick volunteered with the festival organizers and described the experience as being “really fun.”

Shane Margeson, the founding member of the High Country Poetry Society, said the event was the blossoming of the community

“What’s great about this type of event is we can just hop onstage with one mic and perform,” Margeson said. “We did a lot between musical sets, while groups were setting up backstage.”

Story: EMMA SPECKMAN, A&E Reporter

Photo: OLIVIA WILKES, Senior Photographer

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Appalachian
$1371
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1371
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *