The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

Fight for a cure, but end the objectification of women

The+Appalachian+Online
The Appalachian Online

Save the ta-tas! Surely every student at Appalachian State University is familiar with this phrase. The pink ribbon has become a fashion staple, but students should be more aware of what they are wearing.

Unlike the recently controversial Susan G. Komen for the Cure foundation, whose CEO earns a higher annual salary than President Barack Obama, the Save the Ta-tas Foundation donates a percentage of its profit from every item sold to fighting breast cancer.

The Susan G. Komen foundation was recently under fire for revoking grants to Planned Parenthood forbreast cancer screenings, according to www.theblaze.com.

In 2008, Save the Ta-tas Foundation was created by Julia Fikse, who had a dream to cure cancer with playful humor. Unfortunately, Fikse’s fight for a cure has come at a cost to feminism that isn’t remotely funny.

The most popular breast cancer slogan might be Save the Boobies. It’s exciting to see so much support for an important health issue. It’s disappointing that it took the sexualization of a disease without a cure to do so.

Sexualizing breast cancer has gotten the attention of many men and women. The fact that people get more excited about saving a pair of breasts than saving a mother, daughter, wife, lawyer, doctor, teacher, best friend or just fellow human being is downright disgusting.

Cancer shouldn’t be sexualized, because it is not sexy. Breast cancer is painful and scarring; it steals lives. It is the No. 2 killer of women in the cancer field, and actually No. 1 for Hispanic women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Sexualizing this disease is disrespectful, because breast cancer victims are fighting for their lives, not just their breasts. A witty I Love Boobies T-shirt is in not honoring someone who is battling or who has lost their fight with this horrible disease.

That’s not to confuse a lost fight with a lost battle. Tees like those created by Save the Ta-tas Foundation imply to women that losing their breasts is equivalent to losing everything.

Women who have had mastectomies have not lost their fights with cancer. According to a September Stanford University study, 81 percent of women who had double mastectomies in 1998 were still alive 10 years after their diagnoses.

These survivors deserve to feel sexy and powerful without their breasts, despite the changes their bodies have faced. These women have lost a battle, but they have won the fight against breast cancer. They should be proud of a noble choice to save their lives before they saved the ta-tas.

Not only is this campaign disrespectful, but it gives men the wrong idea. Males shouldn’t be taught they should care about breast cancer because they care about breasts. They should care because their loved ones could be lost to breast cancer, and they themselves can get it, too.

So why don’t more people realize how objectifying this advertisement campaign is? We see objectifying campaigns all the time. Women are sexualized to sell Hardee’s burgers, sports cars, electronic devices and now funding for a cure for breast cancer.

Unfortunately, in this sex-sells society, it seems the sex we are selling caters to men the majority of the time. If we’re going to paint breast cancer pink, shouldn’t we come up with something hot to sell testicular cancer, too?

As a society and as human beings, we should continue to search for a cure for breast cancer. We also should try to cure our sex-sells attitude.

If there is one time when a woman definitely shouldn’t be viewed as a sexual object, it is when she is fighting for her life.

Miles, an undeclared sophomore from Rock Hill, South Carolina, is an opinion writer.

View Comments (2)
Donate to The Appalachian
$1065
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1065
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (2)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • K

    KelseyApr 17, 2015 at 1:28 pm

    If we find the cure for breast cancer, we won’t have to get mastectomies. If you think lopping off our mammary glands is appropriate and removing a younger women’s chance of ever breast feeding her child, so be it.

    “Save the ta-tas!” may be a crude way of wording it but let’s face it… it’s a crude way of saying let’s find a cure other then a mastectomy.

    Reply
  • W

    Will Harrison RumleyNov 18, 2014 at 12:56 pm

    Fantastic, refreshing article. I would pay good money for a “Save the Humans” shirt…

    Reply