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The Appalachian

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The Appalachian

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Fraternity and Sorority Life publishes spring 2013 figures

Appalachian State University’s Fraternity and Sorority Life released spring 2013 figures and statistics, which indicated a break from Greek stereotypes.

The report showed success among Greek Life members in academics and community service since a retreat in January that fraternity and sorority leaders on campus attended.

“One main thing that was talked about was perception and how we wanted to be viewed as leaders on our campus and not as lazy students, or the stereotypical fraternity or sorority member,” said Appalachian Panhellenic Association President Kathryn Cannon. “With the help of many, we have met many of our benchmarks as to ‘breaking the stereotype.’”

According to the Spring 2013 Semester at a Glance report, the Greek Community raised more than $13,000 during Greek Week for a family that had lost their home in a fire earlier in the semester. Sororities alone raised $53,913.67 that was donated to area and national philanthropies, foundations and nonprofits while fraternities raised more than $18,000, according to the report.

Fraternities and sororities on campus documented more than 6,500 and 9,000 service hours respectively.

“I’m just proud of them and excited for them to feel challenged and do more and I’m really excited to see what they’re going to do in the fall,” said Becky Cooke, assistant director for Fraternity and Sorority Life. “I knew it was going to be good, but I didn’t know it was going to be that good.”

In addition to fundraising and service hours, Greek Life also listed academic achievements. Seventy-five of its members recorded a 4.0 grade point average and 32 percent of Greek Life members had a 3.5 or higher, according to the report.

“I think it speaks volumes about the students and how they’ve been able to get after it, both in the classroom and out of the classroom,” said Jamar Banks, director of Center for Student Involvement and Leadership.

This is the first semester report for Appalachian Greek Life that had been fully conducted and compiled with participation from Greek organizations in order to help document future information, Cooke said.

Cooke said the Greek stereotype will always remain regardless of the work fraternities and sororities do on campus and in the community.

“Some people want to be that ‘Animal House’ stereotype and often times they’re just not here anymore because they want to be that and they don’t do well,” she said. “They don’t succeed, they have limited numbers and they kind of fall off because they don’t provide anything to anybody other than that social atmosphere. You are what you recruit.”

Cooke, Cannon and Interfraternity Council President David Gordon said they continue to build on Appalachian’s Greek Life presence next semester.

“I believe the first step in Greek Life continuing to build a strong, positive presence on campus is our recruitment process and making sure that we continue to choose high-quality men and women from our campus,” Gordon said. “We will continue to make sure that we are taking these men and women who have the same core values that our organizations were founded on.”

Story: MICHAEL BRAGG, Editor-in-Chief

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