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The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

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Hurricane Sandy leaves waves of destruction

Students brave the snow and wind Monday afternoon as Hurricane Sandy approaches the eastern seaboard. The category 1 hurricane is expected to make landfall by Tuesday morning, with projected winds of up to 60 mph and close to a foot of snow in the area. Justin Perry | The Appalachian As Hurricane Sandy continues gaining strength, preparing for its projected landfall in Delaware, its widespread effects have finally come to Boone.

Within a time span of three hours, the university sent out emails announcing Belk Library and Information Center and Safe Ride would not operate under their normal operation hours Monday night, classes were cancelled before 11 a.m. and the AppalCART was shut down until 9 a.m. Tuesday.

“Hurricane Sandy is currently undergoing a process known as ‘extra tropical transition,’ which occurs when a tropical cyclone interacts with an upper-level trough along a cold frontal boundary,” geography professor Baker Perry said.

 

“In this case, Sandy is transitioning into a powerful extra tropical cyclone that is similar to a Nor’easter.”

In Boone, the grocery stores are feeling Hurricane Sandy’s effects.

Harris Teeter co-manager Devin Hubbard said the store in the Shadowline Shopping Center has seen a 15 percent increase in business compared to last year.

He said the store saw a great influx of business starting Saturday.

“People have been buying just about everything,” Hubbard said. “But we really haven’t run out of anything.”

Similarly, Appalachian’s Director of Food Services Art Kessler said he doesn’t anticipate any problems with Food Services.

“We carry about four to five days of supplies in our storeroom that would sustain us if we were unable to receive any deliveries for a short period of time,” Kessler said. “We may need to alter our regular menus based on what is available, but we would have a good variety of foods.”

Kessler said sales were up in the markets due to storms, but the markets were well-stocked.

Further north, city residents have gone “crazy in terms of preparation,” New York University student Liz Preza said.

“Lines for the supermarkets and delis in my neighborhood wrapped around the block for several hours earlier today,” Preza, a junior sociology major, said. “Most businesses are closed starting this evening and into tomorrow.”

Like Appalachian, New York University cancelled Tuesday’s classes, in addition to Monday’s.

When New York’s subway system shuts down, it, like AppalCART, hinders students’ ability to get to class.

“The subway system will likely directly affect school reopening,” Preza said. “Apparently there is a likelihood of the subways flooding, so it may be a few days until NYU is fully operational.”

Story: ANNE BUIE, Managing Editor and CHELSEY FISHER, News Editor 
Photo: JUSTIN PERRY, Staff Photographer

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