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The Appalachian

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Libertarian club hosts Constitution Week

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The Appalachian Online

The Young Americans for Liberty at Appalachian State University has aimed to promote personal freedom while holding their annual Constitution Week, which began on Sept. 17 and will conclude this Wednesday.

According to www.yaliberty.org, YAL was nationally organized after the 2008 presidential campaign of former congressman Ron Paul. The organization is part of a growing social and political movement that seeks to reestablish libertarian values throughout the country.

National Constitution Day was Sept. 17, which YAL celebrated with various events throughout the day. Club members hosted tables on Sanford Mall to educate students about the organization and Constitution Day.

At the table, they passed out goodie bags and pocket constitutions. They also raffled alcohol to students who participated in a constitution quiz.

President Brandon Partridge said the alcohol they raffled off will be given out to the winners at their social, taking place next week.

“Permission isn’t something we typically seek,” Partidge said.

At 5 p.m. in Belk Hall, professor Marian Williams presented on Policing for Profit on through asset forfeiture.

“Our goal is to inform and offer a network of opportunities to the campus and to attract students with our genuine concern for liberty-related issues,” said Partridge, a sophomore philosophy major.

Often viewed by the public as a far-right wing of the Republican Party, the Appalachian chapter asserts that it is not politically charged, making it different than its national organization.

“Most chapters in our region function similarly to us, meaning anyone who joins will connect to diverse minds of similar passions,” said Partridge, who hopes the club will attract students from both sides of the spectrum.

Partridge said the organization is issue specific, discussing a wide array of topics from the War on Drugs to Free Speech.

“We want to make people think about what is going on in the community, we want to serve as educators to the students,” Partridge said.

The organization accentuates its philosophy of liberty through individuality by encouraging its members to be able to express their thoughts and opinions on issues without feeling the pressure to establish who is right and who is wrong in their views.

“How can we solve problems without worrying about what’s right or wrong? Who’s to say what’s right or wrong anyway? That’s to ask how to solve problems without the government essentially,” Partridge said.

“These questions are the questions I truly hope our group can inspire people to ask themselves. Meditating on these questions liberates the mind from convention.”

The club will finish its Constitution Week  on Wednesday with a presentation on U.S. Interventionism by Center for Stateless Society writer Nathan Goodman. A reception will be held in the Linville Gorge Room of the student union at 5:45 p.m. and the talk will begin at 7 p.m. in Belk Hall 18.

Story: Jonas Heidenreich, Intern News Reporter

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