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OPINION: How to navigate Halloweekend

OPINION%3A+How+to+navigate+Halloweekend
Brianna Bryson

Halloweekend is one of the most anticipated weekends in college, known for the weekend-long festivities. Usually taking place the weekend before, it allows students to have fun and partake in a modified version of Halloween. Costumes, parties and the addition of Homecoming all contribute to the memories people have. Having fun is an important part of the holiday season, but prioritizing safety for oneself and others should be on everyone’s radar. Celebrating is not a pass for being irresponsible and endangering others. Enjoy these tips to have a fun and safe weekend, and to spare the pain of any avoidable hiccups.

#1 Know where you’re going 

In order to party, you have to know where to go. There’s no way someone can be everywhere all at once, and some places will hit capacity early on in the night. If planned before, the chances of getting in and having a fun night are better. Knowing the time and location beforehand allows for planning when to prepare and leave for the night. 

Attempting to find a place the day of will not get you far into the night, and will be a bummer. In a campus of 21,000 students, there will definitely be wait times for parties and rides the day of. There are unofficial parties, such as Greek life and house parties, alongside festivities from App State’s homecoming week and football game. There’s plenty to attend, so make sure to coordinate with your friends on how to go out and about.

#2 Secure a ride to and from

Getting to the event is essential to partying. With parties around Boone, the most effective transportation will likely be Beeping or ridesharing. Most parties will post a Beep list of drivers who can drop off and pick up guests ahead of time, so making a “reservation time” early will make an impact. And leaving is just as important, whether to get back home or another party. You don’t want to be desperately texting Beeps at 10:30 p.m. looking for a ride that will never come. Beep wait times will be longer, and might increase prices for rides. Being prepared to pay for rides via cash or online will make the weekend less stressful. It makes your night plus your Beeper’s night more peaceful. 

If getting a Beep doesn’t work, having a designated driver who can be available all night is another safe driving act. In groups, people can rotate nights so that everyone contributes. Under no circumstances should someone drive while being impaired. It is illegal and puts everyone in danger. Thus, planning ahead ensures everyone gets back home and has a good time out.

#3 Don’t overdo yourself

There’s nothing tackier than being wasted at a party and having your friends help you. Putting yourself in that vulnerable position ruins not only your night but also your friends who will have to help you afterward. The well-being of yourself and others is important and being alert at night is vital to safety. Attempt to travel in groups or pairs during the parties as a precaution, and be mindful of what you’re consuming. 

Plus, nobody wants to wake up feeling hungover or embarrassed. Be aware of individual tolerance, and plan to behave responsibly. And prepare for the aftermath of partying, such as replenishments, food, ice packs, etc. Liquid I.V. and electrolytes can help reenergize for another day of partying or a break day. Don’t forget there are classes on Monday and Tuesday.

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About the Contributor
Emily Escobedo Ramirez
Emily Escobedo Ramirez, Opinion Writer
Emily Escobedo Ramirez (she/they) is a sophomore from Durham, NC. She is a Communication Studies major. This is her second year writing with the Appalachian.
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