The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

OPINION: It takes time to find your path

OPINION%3A+It+takes+time+to+find+your+path
Kaitlyn Close

College is a fusion of careers, coming-of-age experiences, social status and other elements that create various forms of anxiety, sadness and joy in students. At App State, there are many moments of shared experience, such as adjusting to dining hall food and the hassle of classes. Whether an incoming or returning student, the years at App State will be influential in finding one’s path. It is a continuous journey of self-reflection and decisions that will lead to where one is meant to be.

College requires the exploration of interests and skills one obtains to follow a path that hopefully turns into a career. However, branching out in the masses of more than 20,000 students in Boone is incredibly daunting. There are many occasions to learn more about the services offered at App State, with the Club Expo being one. The Club Expo on Sunday, August 20 from 2-5 p.m. is a day for any student to discover many clubs and organizations that are available to join. It’s helpful for all students, regardless of class status as it allows the exploration of interests and connections of students with similarities.. All club information can be found on the Engage website, where students can sign up to attend.  For returning Mountaineers, it’s a reintroduction of opportunities to jump into untouched areas that are intriguing, or were unable to attend due to other commitments. It’s possible one can rekindle a lost passion, an unexplored talent or an aspect that can be influential in a future lifestyle or career. It’s hard to not find something of interest, and one should jump in at these events to explore. 

A critical part of college is the ability to put oneself out there and be engaged in and outside of school. Developing a certain level of vulnerability and curiosity will go miles in crafting experiences here. It’s never too late to get involved or discover new interests, especially as a young adult. One does not enter college and leave the same person, so being willing to become a new, nurtured person is an important step to acknowledge. While it may be nostalgic, it helps ease into the chaos of adulthood.

It’s possible that while here at App State, one might uncover that things aren’t living up to expectations. A disastrous roommate, horrible experience or extraneous factors can lead to transferring or leaving the university. And that’s OK. The college experience is not for everyone and is not required to live a fulfilling life. Paying for an experience that is not positively benefiting a person should be carefully reviewed. One should not uphold themselves to an experience that is not providing an intended outcome. But it’s important to not give up too quickly. A bad semester, courseload or bumpy social experience could potentially turn out fine when given time. Take a chance to allow yourself to assimilate and stay positive unless certain that the Mountaineer life is not it. Having a strong support system is imperative, and communicating with others can help make this type of decision. Overall, it’s possible one’s path requires growth outside of Boone, and if it’s true to an individual, taking the steps to follow it is incredibly brave and unshameful.  

As a college student, continuously growing as a person and a scholar is a part of the process. It’s forgettable in the whim of fitting in with others, pushing through classes and schedules and balancing a social life. As of right now, some students may have planned out their entire life, or have no idea what their intended major is. A bit of advice: don’t ground yourself too early on. Be curious, and allow yourself space and time for growth. This year will contain many professional lessons, life-changing thoughts, personal revelations and new friends that will aid you in learning about yourself. Take charge of your experience, and in doing so, you may find what lies ahead in the future. 

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

More to Discover
About the Contributors
Emily Escobedo Ramirez
Emily Escobedo Ramirez, Opinion Writer
Emily Escobedo Ramirez (she/they) is a sophomore from Durham, NC. She is a Communication Studies major. This is her second year writing with the Appalachian.
Kaitlyn Close
Kaitlyn Close, Graphics Editor
Kaitlyn Close (she/her) is a senior Graphic Design major and Digital Marketing minor. This is her second year with The Appalachian.
Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *