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OPINION: Myth of the Boone brothel law

OPINION%3A+Myth+of+the+Boone+brothel+law
Kaitlyn Close

Members of campus Greek life or those who may have been interested will have noticed the lack of official housing for sororities on campus. A common misconception is that this is due to a supposed “brothel law” enacted in the early days of Boone, which would be said to bar more than four unrelated women from living together, thus outlawing sorority housing. 

The use of the term “brothel” implies misogyny as the reason behind App State’s lack of sorority houses. However, the real reason behind the lack of recognized sorority and fraternity houses in Boone and various other college campuses lies within our zoning laws; which state that no more than two unrelated people may live in a single family neighborhood, which are areas marked in certain zones. 

As far as the brothel myth goes, App State representatives or Greek life executives could better educate their participating students about the true reason behind the lack of housing to avoid misconceptions. 

When it comes to change, there isn’t much fraternities or sororities can do about the law directly besides protest and petition town council. Aside from changing zoning laws, students in Greek life can still take advantage of what they’re left to work with when it comes to housing. Living with three other members of an organization is allowed in certain areas of Boone, and may help people get the most out of their brother or sisterhoods. 

A lot of time and funds go into being a member of one of these organizations so being able to get the most out of membership would seem important. Here are some ways to become more involved with your fraternity or sorority, outside of sharing a house:

#1 Group trips

Whether it’s to the parkway for a night or to Florida for spring break, members of Greek life can always look into ways for their chapters to try something new together. Trips are a great bonding experience and a way to make lasting memories. Small inexpensive trips are just as impactful as the bigger ones, so don’t overlook any opportunity to suggest to the chapter. 

#2 Sleepovers

Just because several members can’t live together, doesn’t mean they can’t stay a night. Themed nights, potluck dinners and even lock-in style trips are great ways to bond with several members at once, or even the whole chapter. Sleepovers are great because they can be thoroughly planned or spontaneous. 

#3 Go international 

It may interest members of executive teams or other members in general to visit their chapters and make friends at other schools. It’s interesting to see how they’ve made use of their housing situations. 

It’s somewhat disappointing that Boone isn’t able to have the white and shining Greek row seen in college movies with the houses with spiral staircase and members lined up chanting in matching outfits at the door. However, Boone can make the most of what it has and continue to hope that maybe one day an addendum will be made. With or without houses, App State’s Greek life can stay strong. 

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About the Contributors
Kaitlyn Close
Kaitlyn Close, Graphics Editor
Kaitlyn Close (she/her) is a senior Graphic Design major and Digital Marketing minor. This is her second year with The Appalachian.
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    JH JoynerSep 28, 2023 at 8:13 pm

    Excellent article. Very well written!

    Reply