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The Appalachian

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OPINION: Valentine’s Day is too commercialized

OPINION%3A+Valentines+Day+is+too+commercialized
Kaitlyn Close

Valentine’s Day is known for its cliche yet thoughtful gifts given to people by those who care for and love them. Teddy bears, roses, chocolate and anything else stereotypically categorized as “lovey dovey” are all staples of this holiday. However, the commercialization of Valentine’s Day almost seems to make the true meanings of love and appreciation become afterthoughts in favor of gift giving. This holiday should not focus on what is bought for someone, but what is felt for them and how somebody chooses to express it. 

Come February, or any time after New Year’s, every store imaginable quickly becomes flooded with a large range of those classic and tacky gifts some people have received at some point in their lives. As cute as the stuffed animal wearing a t-shirt that says “I love you!” is, not everybody has the money to pour into gifts that continuously get more expensive. Nobody should feel guilty for their potential inability to purchase something for their significant other. Money may always be an issue for somebody, somewhere, and even trying to get basic necessities for the first month or two after the holiday season can be a little tough. 

There is nothing wrong with a good homemade gift, and the fact that it is still more than possible to make somebody feel special without dropping excessive amounts of money is something that seems to be getting overlooked as time goes on. Thought and care should always be valued above the monetary value of a gift, and often the gestures that matter the most are the more personal ones designed to make that special someone know that they are special. If you are dead broke, try shooting for a love letter and some origami hearts before you spring for the over-priced big teddy bear and a giant box of chocolate. Half of the chocolates in there will probably be gross anyway. It is always the thought that counts, and anything made by hand or with special care in mind will always bring more warmth to someone than something materialistic. 

Of course, none of this is to say these seasonal gifts are not cute, kind or still reasonable things to buy a partner, but more so to place focus on the true meaning of Valentine’s Day above spending money. Those you care for are more than just the teddy bear and the silly card — they are the ones who make your own life happy and full of love. This holiday exists for a reason, and it is always important to remember that. Money truly does not buy love for anybody, as love is something that must be given with sincerity, not dollar bills.

 

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About the Contributors
Madison Nance, Opinion Writer
Madison Nance (she/her) is a sophomore English major. This is her second year with The Appalachian
Kaitlyn Close, Graphics Editor
Kaitlyn Close (she/her) is a senior Graphic Design major and Digital Marketing minor. This is her second year with The Appalachian.
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