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The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

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The Appalachian

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Students “Make-Their-Own Street sign” at APPS event

Students+Make-Their-Own+Street+sign+at+APPS+event

The Appalachian Popular Programming Society (APPS) hosted a Make-your-Own Street sign event yesterday in the Plemmons Student Union.

The event is one of multiple “fun, free” events hosted by APPS every month, graduate assistant for the special events council Erin Parrish said.

“We do two events per month and they are usually free events for students,” she said. “We just bring in vendors and it’s a first come first serve basis.”

Queen City Novelties, a Charlotte based Event Company, provided equipment for the signs. Jack Bracey founded the company in 2012. Events are a passion for him, he said.

“I used to work for an Entertainment Company before I stated this one.” He said. “I’ve always had a passion for events- I would say I’ve been hosting and volunteering for special events since I was five years old.”

The amount of originality in signs varies, he said.

“The most popular thing for students to get is their names,” he said. “Today I’ve seen a lot of inside jokes that would only make sense to one person- but that’s why people become excited about this, because it’s individualized.”

Morgan Nystedt’s sign, “Waterbugs Ave,” is a shout-out to her favorite vine creator, she said.

Instead of saying whatever, there’s a popular vine creator called Alex James and instead of saying whatever he says ‘waterbugs!’”

Paulo Neto created a sign with his name to ward of future space invasions, he said.  Students could also choose between the words “street” and “way” to accompany the sign’s main lettering.

“I had problems with my ex-roommate, he would sleep in my bed, so now I can put this sign up to say, ‘no touching anything here, this is my stuff.’”

In the past, APPS has hosted events like Build-A-Pet and laser tag. The special events council meets regularly to brainstorm potential ideas.

“There’s really an endless amount of possibilities,” Parrish said. “We have a big brain storming process that we do and all of the students blurt out ideas- we research and find out what vendors can provide. This is a great opportunity for the students to be creative.”

Parrish joined the APPS council as a way to fulfill her graduate apprenticeship requirement, she said. Her sign would be related to the satisfaction she’s found here at ASU.

“If I did my own sign I’m not sure what I would get- I’m not that creative,” she said.  “The location here is really what drew me to Appalachian. I’m originally from Colorado, so I might get ‘Blue Ridge Parkway’ or something like that.”

APPS will hold a variety of free events in October, she said. She recommends students come early for product based events to avoid being turned away.

“We have AppalFest coming up this month and we’ll also have a roommate game show for a cash prizes,” she said. “A week before finals we also do a relax Yosef, with massage chairs.”

Story by: Kelsey Hamm, A&E Editor

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