Twins dribble different routes through Mountaineer basketball

Aaron+and+Andrew+Muse+pose+for+a+photo+following+App+States+142-74+victory+over+Warren+Wilson+Nov.+7%2C+2022.+

Tyler Bishop

Aaron and Andrew Muse pose for a photo following App State’s 142-74 victory over Warren Wilson Nov. 7, 2022.

Kolby Shea

Twin brothers, seniors Aaron Muse and Andrew Muse, play different roles but are foundational to the success of App State basketball. 

The Muse brothers have their roots in basketball and the university. Their grandfather played for the team in the late ‘50s, and their father, uncle and older brother served as managers for the Mountaineers. When head coach Dustin Kerns was a graduate assistant at Tennessee, the then 5-year-old boys came to a team camp with their father, a friend of Kerns. These connections led them to where they are today. 

“We’ve just been surrounded by basketball our whole lives. It’s in our blood,” Andrew Muse said. 

Growing up, they dreamed of playing basketball for their dad, the head coach at Mount Tabor High School, and those dreams were fulfilled. They said they’ve always loved being a part of a team, a part of something bigger than themselves. While the brothers played varsity basketball, Mount Tabor went 43-16. In both 2018 and 2019, they made it to the third round of the North Carolina High School 3A Tournament. Through all the wins, one sticks out. The twins played in the game that secured their father’s 500th win as a coach. They said it was a special moment for them, for their father, for the team and for their family. 

When it was time to decide on college, the brothers originally had separate feelings. At first, Andrew Muse wanted to be different from the rest of his family and carve his own path. However, a visit and tour of the university’s campus changed his mind. Ultimately, he said he knew App State was where he wanted to be. He said he always wanted to play Division I basketball and this felt like his best opportunity. After speaking with Kerns, the opportunity to play a role as a walk-on was something he felt he couldn’t turn down. 

“I just thank God every day that Coach Kerns gave me a shot, and I feel like this is where I’m supposed to be,” Andrew Muse said. 

On the other hand, Aaron Muse always knew he would be a Mountaineer. He was being recruited out of high school to play football at several colleges but decided to try to walk-on at the university. He wasn’t able to make the team, but when that door was closed, Kerns happily opened a new one. Aaron Muse would serve as a manager for the basketball team. 

“I’m just so thankful just to have the opportunity to be a part of this program and just serve the guys and serve others,” Aaron Muse said. 

The twins now have an opportunity to work together, side-by-side, every day. They said they enjoy their time together as part of the basketball team. 

“I could’ve gone and done my own thing and he could’ve gone and done his own thing,” Aaron Muse said. “But it just wouldn’t have been the same.”

Being involved with the team has positively impacted their lives on a higher level. Not only does it set them up for future success, but it has provided many lessons along the way. First and foremost, they learned the value of roles in a program. 

“There’s no job too small and no job too big. Everybody has a role,” Andrew Muse said. “If you do your role to the best of your ability, good things happen.”

The roles they filled weren’t limited to the basketball court, but extended much further into App State basketball as a whole.   

“We are all pieces of the puzzle,” Aaron Muse said. 

The twins and Kerns both got their start at the university in 2019. Kerns credits the pair for being a part of the reason the Mountaineers stopped eight-straight losing seasons. 

“Both have been critical to our success and a huge part of our program on and off the court,” Kerns said. 

Their success at the university is evident, but now they must turn to face the next step of their lives, the next place they hope to find success. They are both K-12 physical education majors, minoring in sports science and coaching. Andrew Muse desires to follow in the footsteps of his family and start a career in coaching while Aaron Muse is not as sure of his plan as his brother is. He plans to either student teach and be an assistant coach with his older brother at Reagan High School, or go to seminary with the hope of going into ministry one day. 

As the basketball season tips off, the duo looks forward to continuing their work with the App State basketball team. Aaron Muse and Andrew Muse have been, and will continue to be, an influential part of the team and the program.