The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

Benefit concert raises money for Alzheimer’s, dementia awareness

Lost+Province+Brewing+Co.+busy+with+people+on+Thursday%2C+Nov.+2+during+the+App+State+Alzheimer%E2%80%99s+Benefit+Concert.+The+event+included+live+music%2C+an+auction+to+raise+money+and+a+portion+of+every+meal+sold+was+donated+to+the+Alzheimer%E2%80%99s+Association.+
Lost Province Brewing Co. busy with people on Thursday, Nov. 2 during the App State Alzheimer’s Benefit Concert. The event included live music, an auction to raise money and a portion of every meal sold was donated to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Caitlin Windsor’s father passed away from early-onset frontotemporal lobe dementia in December 2016. He was 57 years old.

Windsor, a senior exercise science major, along with co-coordinator Rachel Keane, a junior fermentation sciences major, held the ALZ You Need Is Love: Benefit Concert at Lost Province on Thursday. The concert raised money for the Alzheimer’s Association and Dementia Society of America.

The concert featured Treble Attraction, Enharmonix, Meet Me at Two, Modern Vintage and several other local musicians.

Windsor noticed that there was not a club on campus advocating for Alzheimer’s awareness, but knew she was graduating soon and didn’t feel she had time to start a club. Instead, Windsor said she wanted to host a fundraiser.

Kenny Sisk performing during the App State Alzheimer’s Benefit Concert. The event included live music, an auction to raise money and a portion of every meal sold was donated to the Alzheimer’s Association.

“It’s a bigger deal than what people think,” Windsor said. Alzheimer’s has no cure and no survivors, so awareness is important, Windsor said.

She wanted to make sure the fundraiser was something that her friends would enjoy, with food, drinks and a casual atmosphere.

Lauren Small, Enharmonix president and junior public relations major, said that it was rewarding to perform for a crowd that showed support in finding a cure for Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Restaurant-goers left their tables, wine glasses in hand, to sing along and get closer to the performers on stage.

Although the benefit concert’s main goal was to raise money, Windsor ultimately wanted the event to feel like she was hanging out with her friends.

Jennifer Galanti, senior exercise major and a friend of Caitlin’s for many years, said that the variety of the performers made the night enjoyable and unique.

Bands, duets, solo acts and a capella groups performed songs from the 1970s, 1980s and current pop songs throughout the night.

Four attendees wearing purple ALZ You Need Is Love shirts gathered at the bar next to the stage with Stickboy cookies, a donation jar and more purple T-shirts. Queen City Growlers handcrafted a growler, a beer pitcher, specially for the event.

All of the money raised from merchandise sales went to the Alzheimer’s Association and Dementia Society of America as well.

A couple from Boston walked up to the donation jar, where Windsor was sitting with friends, and said that they had a family member recently pass away with dementia. The couple had no prior knowledge that Lost Province would host the benefit concert on Thursday, but they happened to eat dinner there and said they had to donate.

ALZ You Need Is Love raised about $1,200, Windsor said.

In addition, Windsor has a GoFundMe page for the Alzheimer’s Association and Dementia Society of America, which has raised $810 of her $2,000 goal.

Story By: Sydney Wolford, A&E Reporter

Photos By: Halle Keighton, Photo Editor

Featured image: Lost Province Brewing Co. busy with people on Thursday, Nov. 2 during the App State Alzheimer’s Benefit Concert. The event included live music, an auction to raise money and a portion of every meal sold was donated to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal