The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

Deflate-gate should be a warning to NCAA

The+Appalachian+Online
The Appalachian Online

Deflate-gate.

Lately, this seems to be all the world of sports has been obsessing about.

The NFL’s New England Patriots, who defeated the Indianapolis Colts 45-7 in the AFC Championship game before knocking off the Seahawks 28-24 for their fourth Super Bowl in 14 years, were accused after the Colts game of deflating the NFL regulation-size footballs, which are required to have a pressure between 12.5 and 13.5 pounds per square inch, to 11.5 PSI.

The scandal was front and center in the buildup to Super Bowl XLIX, but with the game completed, the discussion may die down.

However, this scandal leads us to question not just the NFL, but also the NCAA College Football regulations and the policies on how cheating and football weight go hand-in-hand.

With all the focus on the Patriots, some may not realize that college football was the first to be subject to accusations of deflating footballs during a game.

In November 2012, the University of Southern California fired third-year head coach Lane Kiffin for deflating footballs during a game against Oregon. The university was fined and now Kiffin is the offensive coordinator at the University of Alabama.

A long-time, unnamed college equipment manager said in an interview with Yahoo! Sports that he believes deflating footballs in college is not that big of a deal. In fact, he said it happens quite often.

“Honestly, I don’t think anybody ever thinks twice about doing it,” the anonymous source told Yahoo! Sports. “It’s normal. Its kind of the game day process.”

When a cheating scandal like deflating the footballs happens in the NFL, more people seem to take notice. It seems nobody is really discussing it at the college level, even though it may be happening with some teams.

The NCAA has the same football size regulations, and has the balls checked the same way that the NFL does. The NCAA has proven to take handling rule violations very seriously, but some don’t look at deflating the ball as “cheating” because it happens so often.

Former Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback and South Carolina head coach Steve Spurrier said he believes many college teams have gotten away with the trick of deflating footballs in college.

“All the ball boy has to do is carry their little needle,” Spurrier said in an interview with USA Today. “That’s all that needs to be done. You know that.”

As the NFL tries to look more into the situation of the footballs being deflated, the NCAA should also try to look more into their own policies, too, just in case.
Ultimately, the NCAA can learn a lesson from the NFL here.

Now is the time to zoom in more on issues like this in college football. It is time for NCAA to double-check that all of their policies are being upheld – before we have another scandal in the sports world.

Column: Jason Huber, Intern Sports Reporter

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Appalachian
$1271
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1271
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *