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The Appalachian

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The Appalachian

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The Appalachian

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OPINION: Freshman Etiquette 101

OPINION%3A+Freshman+Etiquette+101
Rian Hughes

Freshmen, please read this article. This is the time everyone is anxious but excited about their independence. Many times freshmen will learn life lessons on their own, taking what they learn and applying it as they go. However, to the current incoming freshmen, here are some tips:

#1 Know the classroom bathroom policy

This seems like a silly tip, but it is something freshmen need to know. Some students have the capability to go an entire class without using the bathroom and congratulations to those students, but most students will need to use the bathroom during class. Now, some professors do ask students to request to use the bathroom, but if the professor does not specify, freshmen should not ask. It is one of the easiest ways for a class to pick out who a freshman is. The professors can and will get annoyed relatively quickly with the constant requests to use the bathroom. Many times, the classroom is large enough that if every student was to ask to use the bathroom, the professor would never get to teach. So, unless the professor specifies or the freshmen want to annoy a professor, do not ask to use the bathroom, just go.

#2 Get involved

One of the fun things about college is making new friends and creating fun memories with friends. It is relatively difficult for a freshman to make new memories, when they have no friends. A freshman getting involved in a club can fix this problem. Every year, App State hosts a club expo to show off the majority of the  250 plus clubs. It can not be stressed enough: go to the Club Expo and join at least one club. With the amount of clubs, it can be overwhelming, but signing up for one club will make all of the difference. If a freshman is lost on where to start, The Appalachian, the student newspaper, is always looking for new people to join. It can be difficult to find something that can fit a person’s interests, but somehow, if a freshman looks hard enough, there is a possibility to find one.

#3 Know the campus

This might seem like an obvious one, and to the freshmen that know everything, this can be skipped over.  App State has a beautiful campus with beautiful brick buildings, the issue is most of the buildings look the same. In fact, it is incredibly easy to get lost on campus, so it is recommended to check where your classes are beforehand. With some sophomores still getting lost on where their classes are, freshmen should not be scared to ask for help. The first week freshmen are up on campus is not just so they can party, it is also so they can get used to their surroundings. Another thing to check with people is where to eat and where to hang out. Many of The Appalachian articles, especially our Best of Boone editions, are there to assist freshmen in finding the good spots around campus. Freshmen talking to the upperclassmen is also helpful, because then they find out other popular opinions, such as the dining hall and meal plan not being a fan favorite. This tip seems obvious, but many freshmen choose to skip over it.

Overall, the incoming freshmen can already be overwhelmed with inserting themselves into a new environment, not knowing everyone or anything. These tips are meant to help freshmen, not scare them. Again,  do not be afraid to ask questions in these upcoming weeks. It is important to note that freshmen are now Mountaineers. The App State student body stands up for one another and wants to see everyone succeed. No one is going to judge anyone for not having all of the answers. Every upperclassman at App State was freshmen once too, never forget that.

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About the Contributors
Bella Lantz
Bella Lantz, Associate Opinion Editor
Bella Lantz (she/her) is a sophomore secondary education-english major from Denver, NC.
Rian Hughes
Rian Hughes, Associate Graphics Editor
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