Raleigh-based band brings alternative sounds to Legends

Ethan Murphy, Reporter

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A mannequin with a microphone, space-filling guitar loops and room-rocking bass lines set the stage for the show at Legends Jan. 30.

Originally from Raleigh, the band Blue Frequency played two sets consisting of all original songs and one cover. Each song blended a distinct element of metal, alternative and psychedelia. 

“We all try to write complete songs on our own, but we bring them to each other for final tweaks, and that’s how we get the final cut. This way, we put our fingerprints on every song we release,” lead guitarist Spencer “Cash” Beck said.

Every band member plays multiple instruments, allowing for flexibility during showtime. During their second set, drummer Causey Brady IV took the reins as lead guitarist for their song “Minotaur,” while Beck played drums.

We all started playing instruments around high school, but we didn’t all get together until about five years ago. Being out of college now, we’ve all been able to focus more recently on making music.”

— Lee Roberts

“We all started playing instruments around high school, but we didn’t all get together until about five years ago. Being out of college now, we’ve all been able to focus more recently on making music,” lead singer Lee Roberts said.

With this newfound energy, the band recently finished an untitled and unreleased album. In the meantime, they have released an EP titled “Into the Red.”

“Over the years, we’ve figured out a nice balance of variety and uniformity when we make songs, so we can make them all unique in their own way, but they’ll still have our sound,” Roberts said.

Gray Jackson, a sophomore nursing major, attended the show with his friend, Sam Haffey, a junior marketing major.

“Honestly, Blue Frequency was just too cool of a name to pass up. This is the first show I’ve been to on campus, and I’ll definitely be coming back,” Jackson said.

Haffey said he has attended larger concerts that were less exciting, but said he really liked Blue Frequency’s energy on stage. 

Holland McLean, a senior public administration major and club shows chairperson with Appalachian Popular Programming Society, helps to organize music acts on campus.

“This venue in general is an extremely unique one. Bringing local bands and rising artists is unprecedented on a lot of college campuses. With that in mind, we’re always working to bring in diverse, eclectic musical tastes to fulfill the needs of any student on campus,” McLean said. 

McLean encourages any students excited to dive into Boone’s music scene to consider joining APPS.

“Working with the council is a really laid back environment. We work together to bring music to the students, and it’s really fun to see where our different tastes in music take us,” Mclean said.

Anyone looking to apply can find more information on the webpage APPS.appstate.edu or instagram at APPSASU.