The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

University Police warns of telephone scams

The+Appalachian+Online
The Appalachian Online

Appalachian State University students and faculty received an email on Nov. 30 regarding telephone scams in several different states, including North Carolina, over the past couple of weeks.

The email said college students have been the target of the telephone scams.

The callers claim to be the IRS, local police departments and sheriff’s departments. They tell those who answer the phone calls that they owe money for different reasons. In the case of someone hanging up, the scammers call back under a false caller ID that identifies them as 911.

The victim of this call is typically told that they have committed a minor crime, such as running a red light at a traffic camera, failing to appear as a jury member or failing to pay taxes. The victim is then directed to pay over the phone ranging from $500 to $2,500.

“Generally, they refer to these as telephone scams,” said University Police Captain Todd Corley. “They are calling people telling them they owe money and assign them a green dot card, which allows the scammer to transfer profit from the victim more easily.

Corley said University Police wants people to know that no law enforcement agency is going to require you to pay for anything over the phone rather than in the mail.

This is a known scam, and alerts have been issued by the FBI to the public. University Police urge that if you receive this type of call, tell the caller you know it is a scam and you are contacting the police.

If you wish to report a call, please file a complaint through the Federal Trade Commission at ftccomplaintassistant.gov.  If you have any other questions or information regarding these scams, all are urged to contact University Police at 828-262-2150.

Story: Mary Wood, Intern News Reporter

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *