The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

‘The Boy Who Flies’ filmmakers help dreams take flight on Sanford Mall

Benjamin Jordan, director of the film “The Boy Who Flies,” demonstrates paragliding and kite making to students on Sanford Mall on Friday. Approximately 40 students showed up to make kites out of newspaper and share their aspirations for the future. Photo by Justin Perry | The Appalachian

Benjamin Jordan, director of the film “The Boy Who Flies,” demonstrates paragliding and kite making to students on Sanford Mall on Friday. Approximately 40 students showed up to make kites out of newspaper and share their aspirations for the future. Photo by Justin Perry  |  The Appalachian
Filmmakers Godfrey Masauli and Benjamin Jordan led a paraglider demonstration and showed students the process of making and flying recycled kites Friday afternoon on Sanford Mall in promotion of their film “The Boy Who Flies,” a documentary that is part of Banff Mountain Film Festival.

The pair visited Boone to speak about the film and spread what they said was its message: Chase your dreams, no matter how out of reach they seem.

The filmmakers were persuaded to come by the Cultural Awareness and Student Engagement Council of the Appalachian Popular Programming Society, created this year to attract support and awareness of international culture on campus.

The event attracted approximately 40 participants and began with group members sharing personal aspirations and dreams, which ranged from wishes to travel and become parents to paying for family members’ education.

“I think this speaks a lot to the kind of community that we have here where it’s a lot of people who are very interested,” said CASE Chairperson Karissa Goff.

“We’re all very curious just to see what’s going on and what’s out there. Hearing what people want to do really speaks to that.”

Masauli’s dream, which eventually inspired the film that brought him to Boone, was simply to fly.

“I had this long life dream to fly, but in Malawi that dream wasn’t there,” Masauli said. “Everybody in Malawi told me that it was impossible to become a pilot, but I believed in my heart that one day I was going to fly.”

Five years after completing school, Masauli met Jordan, a paraglider pilot, while he was visiting the area to scope out locations for a potential documentary. After a few weeks spent together, the two became fast friends and taught each other many things, including paragliding.

“This film wasn’t actually supposed to happen.” Jordan, a still-photographer by trade, said. “When I was there doing that research and meeting people I met Godfrey and things were just happening in such a serendipitous way that I felt there was no part of me that could just push pause and wait to get the funds to do it properly.”

These appearances at Appalachian State University mark the beginning of a three-month tour of the U.S. before moving to other countries in preparation for this year’s Banff festival in Alberta, Canada.

“It was probably the most amazing experience of my life, and it’s so great to share that with the people of the world and the people at Appalachian State,” Jordan said.

Boone area businesses, along with the school’s support, donated a surplus of paragliding equipment so that Masauli can return to Africa to open the School of Dreams, a motivational program for youth that incorporates paragliding with personal growth and development.

More information about the film is available at theboywhoflies.com.

Story: LOVEY COOPER, Senior A&E Reporter
Photo: JUSTIN PERRY, Photo Editor

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Appalachian
$1111
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1111
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *