The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

Hillel Passover dinner promotes peace for students

Hillel hosted the Mountaineer Passover Seder in the Blue Ridge Ballroom in Plemmons Student Union on Tuesday night, where all students and community members, whether Jewish or not, were encouraged to celebrate the religious holiday.

“It’s very important to give the multicultural groups a voice and show that there [are] so many things to be learned, all over the world,” said Judith Bernholc, junior advertising major and head of advertising for Hillel.

Sophomore biology majors Emily Boaz (right) and Rachel Gordon (left) create a matzah sandwich with horseradish, called maror, and apple and walnut salad, called charoset. This sandwich is called the korech and symbolizes affliction and bitterness. Photo by Rachel Krauza  |  The Appalachian
Sophomore biology majors Emily Boaz (right) and Rachel Gordon (left) create a matzah sandwich with horseradish, called maror, and apple and walnut salad, called charoset. This sandwich is called the korech and symbolizes affliction and bitterness. Photo by Rachel Krauza | The Appalachian

Passover is a Jewish holiday celebrated over the course of eight days. It tells the story of how God saved the people of Israel from slavery in Egypt, and celebrates the freedom of those people.
Seder is a dinner that takes place during Passover, which involves rituals and prayer throughout the night.

“My favorite part about the dinner was the community togetherness that we have,” Benjamin Goldberg, president of Hillel, said. “That everyone is willing to share this and learn about a culture different than theirs.”

This is the first time the dinner was free after the event received grants from N.C. Hillel, Center for Student Involvement and Leadership and the office of Multicultural Student Development, allowing more people to attend.

The dinner was provided by Appalachian Food Services and was comprised of a traditional Jewish meal, which included chicken matzo ball soup, kugel and matzo. Seating was open, allowing for strangers to meet and have conversation.

“Sitting with random people at tables was different because usually I’m with my entire family so sitting with friends and strangers was cool,” Casey Maslow, freshman cellular molecular biology major, said.

Goldberg said he believes it is important to have Passover Seder on campus every year.

“It is important to educate the community about cultures other than theirs, and to allow people to become more knowledgeable and tolerant of people different from them,” he said. “I think it’s a good form for people to come experience Judaism and to enjoy it like we do.”

Story by Casey Suglia, Intern A&E Reporter

Photo by Rachel Krauza, Senior Photographer

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *