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The Appalachian

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The Appalachian

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OPINION: Christmas isn’t the same anymore

OPINION%3A+Christmas+isn%E2%80%99t+the+same+anymore

Coming back home from college is like being in a daydream. Returning to a place filled with familiar faces and landmarks while being older is an eerie experience. Especially during the holiday season, memories come back in full swing, leaving one with mixed emotions. As aging college students, it is unavoidable to be confronted with the reminder of growing up, and it can be a lot. With so much going on in the world, it is important to recognize that the transition from childhood to adulthood will be both bittersweet and amazing. 

The joy of wonder is something that never fades with age. As children, it is a fascinating thing to experience something that truly is wondrous. In school, the buzz of the holiday and school events catered to it made it all memorable. Having movie days instead of actual class with cookies, hot chocolate and crafts created a carefree environment that made the anticipation of Christmas even stronger.

For example, the viewing of “The Polar Express” reinforces the work of Santa and the meaning of believing in Christmas. The adventure that the children embarked on and the scenery of the snowy night made the anticipation of the holiday stronger. 

“The Grinch” also holds the same effect. Seeing the Grinch learn the importance of Christmas and learning to be kind to save Whoville will never get old. These films show the simplicity of Christmas; they do not reflect inflation, the hassle of traveling and other obstacles that plague the holidays these days. All that was on the minds of kids were the gifts that Santa Claus would be bringing. Having countdowns to the break plastered in the hallways with wintery decorations made the month feel whimsical. Films transported us into a world that showed magical creatures and snow-covered trees with presents and allowed our youthful imagination to run wild for December. 

Now as college students, growing up has proved to be a double-edged sword. We reminisce about the obliviousness that came with being a kid, yet have to balance being a student and an adult in the world. There are wars, environmental destruction, limited job markets and evermore concerning matters that plague the world. The transition of this mindset can be challenging, especially having to come to terms with the end of our childhood. 

However, there are also positive outlooks, such as the introduction of friends, exploring various passions and the excitement of starting a new chapter of life. Being older does not hinder us from continuing to participate in activities. Movies and crafts can still be enjoyed, gifts exchanged with friends and family at smaller budgets and the winter decorations in our rooms and homes. The spirit of the winter holidays can still be continued as adults, allowing us to continue with the festivities and ambiance that come with it. 

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About the Contributor
Emily Escobedo Ramirez, Opinion Writer
Emily Escobedo Ramirez (she/they) is a sophomore from Durham, NC. She is a Communication Studies major. This is her second year writing with the Appalachian.
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