The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

Reproductive rights become focus of new student club

A pair of students are in the process of forming an official club that focuses on the idea that all people have the right to make their own choices about their bodies, health care and the right time to raise a happy and healthy family.

The Reproductive Justice Club held its first meeeting on Thursday, January 22nd and was lead by Anna Lobastova (far left) and Maddie Majerus (far right). The club was created to educate and get people engaged on the issue of environmental, racial, sexual, gender, and economic justice that takes it beyond the talk of pro-choice and pro-life. Photo by Halle Keighton  |  The Appalachian
The Reproductive Justice Club held its first meeeting on Thursday, January 22nd and was lead by Anna Lobastova (far left) and Maddie Majerus (far right). The club was created to educate and get people engaged on the issue of environmental, racial, sexual, gender, and economic justice that takes it beyond the talk of pro-choice and pro-life. Photo by Halle Keighton | The Appalachian

Anna Lobastova, senior global studies major, and Maddie Majerus, senior political science major, are the founders of the Reproductive Justice club, which they hope to make official through Appalachian State University.

According to www.protectchoice.org, reproductive justice can be defined as the “complete physical, mental, spiritual, political, social and economic well-being of women and girls, based on the full achievement and protection of women’s human rights.”

Majerus said the club is very intersectional.

“Reproductive justice moves away from the typical pro-life, pro-choice argument because that argument really boils down to ‘Should abortion be legal and should we have access to abortion?’” Majerus said. “Reproductive justice focuses on [the question] ‘Are people able to raise a happy, healthy family at a time they choose?’”

The club will include activism and education. On the activism front, Majerus and Lobastova anticipate working with other clubs and organizations for their events, while also creating their own events and inviting the community to participate.

“Reproductive justice is a really huge umbrella term that can be really, really confusing to people,” Majerus said. “We were thinking about having several nights where we would have an issue and really talk about it, and that could range from anything like bingo or watching a documentary or having a presentation or guest speakers come in. We’re looking for a community based thing where we go and do things together, but also keep it educational.”

A central topic of interest for the club, particularly in the educational aspect, is pregnancy centers. Majerus cited the Hope Pregnancy Resource Center on Howard Street as an example.

“Crisis pregnancy centers pose as medical centers and they do not disclose to their patients that they are not medical centers; they do not disclose to their patients that they do not perform abortions or give abortion referrals,” Majerus said. “They get people coming in their doors thinking that it is an abortion clinic, so that they can convince them not to get an abortion and they do that through a variety of ways.”

According to www.choosehope.org, the Hope Pregnancy Resource Center website, during a visit to the center, all options for an unplanned pregnancy would be discussed.

“They are funded by our state, so your tax dollars are going toward funding crisis pregnancy centers,” Majerus said. “A lot of people don’t realize what they are, they are very convincing in being like, ‘we are a clinic for women and we talk about choice,’ when they don’t. They’re not forthright in what their actual goal is.”

Majerus said these types of clinics outnumber abortion clinics 8:1 in the state of North Carolina and mainly target women of color and college-aged students.

“I think this is really important to [Appalachian], specifically because we don’t have an abortion provider nearby,” Lobastova said. “If you call ASU Health Services and ask for information on an abortion referral, they actually send you to the CPC, which is on Howard Street.”

Lobastova and Majerus plan on opening the club to non-students, although those members will not be able to hold an administrative position with the club or vote.

“We want to make the club open to the community,” Lobastova said. “We want to take the education aspect to Boone because we don’t have reproductive access here.”

Story: Nicole Caporaso, Senior News Reporter
Photo: Halle Keighton, Photographer

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *