The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

Review: Victor Wooten comes to Legends, new release disappoints

Correction: A previous version of this article did not identify this article as a review. The Appalachian apologizes for the confusion.

Editor’s Note: The following reflects the opinions of the author.

Bassist Victor Wooten, whose recording career spans three decades, has long been considered one of the most technically skilled musicians in recent history.

The five-time Grammy Award winner is set to release “Words and Tones” and “Sword and Stone” in September. Dates for both releases are inconclusive.

The promotional release The Appalachian received from The Victor Wooten Band included seven songs, five from “Words and Tones” and two from “Sword and Stone.”

Wooten still displays his classic skills on both upright and electric bass, providing both a nice background for the rest of the instrumentation and a subtle lead in the mixing.

After a kind tip of the hat to Wooten for his technical proficiency comes a rude awakening when one realizes the overall sound of the music doesn’t reach an equivalent plateau.

When an artist is considered the best in a genre, expectations abound as to what direction should be taken artistically. Wooten is technically incredible, so one expects nothing less than the best.

But the project birthed by The Victor Wooten Band falls short of being heralded as the royal project its leading man is supposed to provide.

“I know that Victor Wooten is technically supposed to be good, but I just hate listening to his music,” junior economics major Jason Capps said. “It’s like solving a math problem trying to listen to a song that he plays on.”

However, technical proficiency doesn’t always guarantee artistry or a sense of the artist thinking, “I actually want to be playing this song right now.”

Wooten and his backing band never leave an instance for the track to breathe, and while the songs rhythmically resolve, there is no sense of feeling displayed by anyone involved in the project as a whole.

Still, some like to go along for the ride and milk as much enjoyment as possible out of Wooten’s music.

“I love what Victor Wooten can do on the bass,” junior electronic media broadcasting major Clay Harris said. “He brings out a sound in his guitar like Hendrix did.”

Wooten’s sound on “Words and Tones” and “Sword and Stone” — The Victor Wooten Band’s first releases as a collective — is in the same vein as previous releases, including his 2008 release “Palmystery.” Here, Wooten slaps the bass as efficiently and proficiently as ever.

Love him or hate him, Wooten performs at Legends Sept. 26. Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door.

Story: WILL GREENE, Intern A&E Reporter

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Appalachian
$1111
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1111
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *