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Town of Boone implements new downtown parking regulations

The+Town+of+Boone+uses+meters+and+meter+attendants+to+regulate+parking+downtown.
The Town of Boone uses meters and meter attendants to regulate parking downtown.

The Town of Boone will implement several changes concerning downtown parking regulations, according to a recent press release.

Among these changes include revisions to employee parking, the reinstatement of resident parking permits, changes to construction parking permits and price increases for certain parking lots. These changes will go into effect July 1.

Employers in the Downtown Boone Municipal Service District will be required to provide a list of authorized employees in order for those employees to obtain an employee parking permit.

For the 2024-25 fiscal year, the Boone Town Council reinstated resident parking permits. Permits are limited to residents of the Downtown Boone Municipal Service District who acquire proof through landlords or provide proof of ownership. Resident permits will cost $1,000 per year. According to the press release, this cost “compares favorably” to private resident passes, which can “cost as much as $1,400 for the full year.”

Reselling of these permits will be prohibited, and the number of permits will be limited to no more than 65 designated spaces at the upper end of the Queen Street Lot.

Construction permits will no longer be free and will cost $18 per day. These permits are limited to vehicles used specifically for tool access, dumpster parking or closure of spaces to allow for construction. Permits will be limited to three per job site. 

The new changes will also impact parking prices and fines.

The Jones House employee permit lot will increase to $475 for the 2024-25 fiscal year. All other employee parking locations such as Queen Street, Elevated Queen Street Lot and Upper Library Lot will remain the same price.

The price to park in the Daniel Boone Park, also known as the Horn in the West Lot, has increased to $600 and is valid from August through May. All other parking regulations for the lot will still apply, such as the removal of vehicles from the lot on Friday evenings and no Saturday parking.

Additionally, the per-violation fine for violating the time limit at metered spots will increase to $25.

Two banks of three free 30-minute parking spaces will be implemented near the Watauga County Courthouse and North Depot Street which will be marked with “appropriate signage.” Fines for exceeding the time limit will apply to these spaces. These designated parking spaces will “help facilitate takeout pick-up and quick errands.”

According to the press release, additional revenue gained from the new regulations will be used to offset administrative and infrastructure costs of downtown parking. Additionally, the revenue will be used to facilitate the addition of employee parking spaces at the Rivers House, “hopefully sometime in the FY 2025-26.”

The Town of Boone created a parking proposal in April suggesting an increase of the hourly parking meter rate to $2 an hour, but there was no mention of the suggestion in the June 17 press release.

The Town of Boone’s parking group will be available to offer public brainstorming sessions to “explore other solutions” to the “ongoing challenges” of downtown parking. The Town of Boone encourages people to stay tuned for the announcement of these dates.

For additional information regarding the new changes to downtown parking, individuals can contact Town Hall at (828) 268-6200 or at the Town of Boone’s parking website.

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About the Contributor
Madalyn Edwards
Madalyn Edwards, Associate News Editor
Madalyn Edwards (she/her) is a junior English major from Mount Airy, NC. This is her second year with The Appalachian.
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    AnonJun 22, 2024 at 11:29 pm

    Employees should not have to pay to go to work

    Reply