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The Appalachian

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David Searcy looks to bring 27 years of law enforcement experience to the sheriff’s office

David+Searcy%2C+republican+candiate+for+Watauga+County+Sheriff%2C+poses+in+front+of+a+flowing+mountain+river.
David Searcy, republican candiate for Watauga County Sheriff, poses in front of a flowing mountain river.

David Searcy will run on the Republican ticket for sheriff of Watauga County in the upcoming election.

Searcy has worked in law enforcement in Watauga County for 27 years. He has also worked as a general instructor, specialized instructor in officer survival, defensive tactics, gaining intelligence officer and field liaison officer. He also teaches Highway Patrol cadets in Raleigh.

Searcy said he is interested in working hands-on with citizens in the community. He said he would like to start up programs that help with domestic violence, drug addiction and at-risk youth.

“The greatest thing we can take out of this is the children that grow up in these families will see mom and dad, or their parents, interacting or solving conflict in a different manner than turning to drugs and alcohol and then violence,” Searcy said.

Searcy said he also wants to start programs within the prison, such as a ministry program, to help people transition after their time incarcerated to live free of drugs and violence. He said he would also like to have business owners come to the prison to teach interview skills.

“Law enforcement gets a call, law enforcement responds or we make an arrest, the person goes through the court system if they are convicted and they get jail time or prison sentence,” Searcy said. “Sometimes, within three or four months, we see the same people cycling back through.“

Searcy said the program will also help at-risk youth by putting at least one resource officer at every school in Watauga County.

“We have had one resource officer that covers six schools that are out in the county,” Searcy said. “The response time to get to some of our outline schools, should a crisis emerge where law enforcement was needed, has not increased with technology but has decreased with the amount of traffic that we see on the roads out here.”

Searcy attends Laurel Fort Baptist Church, volunteers at the Grandfather Home for Children,  is a foreign missionary to Haiti and a member of the masonic lodge in Watauga County. He was also president of the Appalachian Shrine Club.

Searcy said he would like to reach out to fraternities here on campus.

“Through that, we have the Shriners Hospital, and I am currently trying to reach out to fraternities to help them raise funds, help the Shriners here raise funds,” Searcy said. “Partnering together and getting the students more involved in our community also through several civic clubs we have here in the county also.

“Law enforcement is not just about enforcing the laws. It’s helping and serving the community. If we can help bring the community and law enforcement together, then that’s how we build better programs,” Searcy said.

Searcy is running against incumbent Len Hagaman for Watauga County Sheriff.

Story by Anna Dollar

Photo courtesy of David Searcy 

Featured photo caption: David Searcy, Republican candidate for Watauga County Sheriff, poses in front of a flowing mountain river.

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About the Contributor
Anna Dollar
Anna Dollar, News Reporter
Sophomore Communication, Journalism major Twitter: @Anna_Carrr Email: dollarac@appstate.edu
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