University looking to distribute vaccines in the community

Katie+Knapp+preps+needles+with+the+Moderna+vaccine+for+patients+waiting+in+the+parking+lot.+The+Moderna+vaccine+has+to+thaw+in+the+refrigerator+for+two+hours%2C+then+sit+in+room+temperature+for+15+minutes+before+being+administered+to+patients.+

Jesse Barber

Katie Knapp preps needles with the Moderna vaccine for patients waiting in the parking lot. The Moderna vaccine has to thaw in the refrigerator for two hours, then sit in room temperature for 15 minutes before being administered to patients.

Jackie Park, Editor-in-Chief

App State is taking the first step to become a center for COVID-19 vaccine distribution in the High Country.

Chancellor Sheri Everts announced in an email Friday that the university submitted an application to the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services that would make App State a “community-facing” vaccine distribution site. If approved, this would mean that the university would distribute vaccines to both university and local communities when allotments are available.

AppHealthCare is leading vaccine distribution in Watauga, Ashe and Alleghany counties. Those 65 and older, health care workers and long-term care staff and residents are currently able to receive the vaccine; however, as time passes, more vaccines will become available and more groups will be able to receive the vaccine.

The university’s COVID-19 site now features information about COVID-19 vaccines, like what to do if you want a vaccine, which priority group you fall in and information about the vaccine’s safety.Faculty and staff are in priority group 3 for the vaccine, while students are in group 5.

AppHealthCare created a vaccine interest form to sign up for a notification when your priority group is eligible for a vaccine.