The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

Eggers should show integrity, admit mistakes

Corey Color WEB

Corey Color WEB
By now, students have heard of the impending changes to the Watauga County voting process.

Earlier this month, the county’s Board of Elections appointed Republican Luke Eggers to the third seat on the board. Soon after, a meeting was held, during which big changes to the county voting were implemented.

Eggers said in an interview with WRAL that the changes will streamline voting and save money.
Despite the fact that Watauga County Elections Director Jane Ann Hodges disputed his claims, he continued to push until the changes went through.

But Hodges wasn’t the only resistance he would face.

Eggers was warned during the meeting that he had violated his oath by consulting with Watauga County Republican Party Chairwoman Amanda Marie Yates about the voting plan because her brother is running for office, according to WRAL.

In my opinion, Eggers should step forward and issue a public statement about the controversy.

The same report also states the details of the meeting were included in the draft minutes, but the three-member board approved a third version of the minutes last week. The new version left out key details, stating that precinct locations were discussed and Yates was not mentioned.

Raleigh attorney Mike Tadych told WRAL that he thinks the edited minutes are legal.

It would seem to me that covering up the meeting is a poor move, and Eggers still has not made any public comments on the matter.

If you can forgive Eggers for virtually flipping Watauga County voting on its head, can you also forgive him for omitting certain parts of a board meeting to keep him out of hot water?

As college students, maybe we can learn a lesson from Eggers.

More than anything, he teaches us how we shouldn’t act. Sometimes running from the truth and attempting to bury it is worse than simply facing it.

Sometimes you have to step up and take fault for your actions.

Eggers isn’t gaining any popularity with the younger demographic in Watauga County. Perhaps admitting his faults will raise his popularity level, or maybe the damage has already been done.

Spiers, a junior journalism major from Charlotte, is the opinion editor.

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *