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OPINION: Football Etiquette 101

OPINION%3A+Football+Etiquette+101
Gracean Ratliff

Football games are some of the highlights of the college experience, and normally attending one is a fun experience with friends. The crowds constantly chanting, the marching band playing and the overall atmosphere of Kidd Brewer Stadium brings a sense of school pride and game day spirit. 

However, at the same time, it is not fun when beers are poured on people, constant obscenities are being yelled, people are being squished to the point of barely breathing and trash is everywhere. These are just a few aspects that contribute to the overstimulating atmosphere football fans can create. There is a way for everyone to enjoy the games and feel the atmosphere football is always meant to create. It just takes following a few simple rules:

#1 Hold the alcohol

Now, this rule is not talking about the fun experience of getting overly drunk at a game and not being able to hold the alcohol, although this experience is not recommended. This rule is more referring to the alcohol being held tightly in the hands of people. To paint a picture, many people are holding their alcohol when suddenly, the team scores the winning touchdown. Everyone erupts into cheers, except for the people that get alcohol all down the front or back of them. Not many people want to smell like alcohol at the end of the game, especially for the people who will not or cannot drink. It is perfectly reasonable to want a drink during the game, just as reasonable as it is to put the drink on the bench or hold it down at waist level when standing and yelling that the opposing team should have a penalty. Also, why waste an expensive drink by throwing it around? This is a financially responsible rule everyone should follow.

#2 Respect the personal space bubble

The many people that have gone to football games have more than likely experienced the joys of being squished in a crowd. There are many vertically challenged people in the world who can easily get lost in a sea of people and they deserve their space as much as taller people do. Tall people do sometimes need more room, but they should still be mindful of the people around them. Since everyone needs their own room, people should be mindful of other people’s space. Eliminate the most stressful, claustrophobic part of football games by not popping any personal bubbles.

#3 Stop destroying things

It is exciting when a football team wins, however it does not justify anyone going around destroying property around the stadium. In 2022, a temporary art installation in the Duck Pond was vandalized and ripped apart after a win against Texas A&M. Wey Hall was also raided after the 2022 game against the Tar Heels. If people are really excited that the team won, jump up and down in the stadium, run around campus, get with people on Sanford Mall and have a celebration, but do not vandalize school property. It has no benefits and negatively impacts both the university and the surrounding community. App State is known for its school spirit shared among students, but the surrounding community does not see that. All the community sees is a bunch of college students gone wild having no respect for the university and community they are spending most of their time in. Please stop destroying property because emotions are running high.

Football games are everywhere in movies and are practically embedded in American culture. Students grow up getting told what college football games are like, especially from others who have attended one. Unless they experience it themselves, these are the only real comparisons students have until attending one themselves. Many people enjoy watching football and want to share the love of the sport by inviting people to join in getting a ticket. However, it is difficult to have someone enjoy football, when people do not respect each other’s time and space during a game. These are not difficult rules meant to stump anyone. Instead, it is a good refresher that these football games are just games. The love for the sport should be respected, just as the people and surrounding areas should be as well.

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About the Contributors
Bella Lantz
Bella Lantz, Associate Opinion Editor
Bella Lantz (she/her) is a sophomore secondary education-english major from Denver, NC.
Pruett Norris
Pruett Norris, Multimedia Editor
Pruett Norris (he/him) is a senior double majoring in English with a concentration in Film Studies and Electronic Media/Broadcasting. This is his second year with The Appalachian.
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  • M

    MuChaoSep 20, 2023 at 7:29 am

    #4 – Stop relying on student fees to subsidize your program’s financial losses. Students should not be forced to subsidize entertainment, especially so at a public university whose mission statement includes nothing about athletics, esp. given that athletics contributes *absolutely nothing* to the actual mission: education. Rather, it leaves countless students further in debt as full-time students are *forced* to pay over $1000/year in student fees to subsidize athletics’ annual financial losses and the pre-existing debt associated with the construction of athletics facilities.

    If a student can opt-out of paying the textbook rental program fee, why can they not opt of of subsidizing athletics?! *Many* students will never attend a game, nor reap any actual benefit from the athletic program! Additionally, if a student is taking out loans to attend school, then they’ll be paying even more over time as they will also be paying interest on this student fee. It’s absolutely criminal.

    Years ago, the administration claimed that “athletics stands on its own two feet” (i.e. it funds itself), yet that has never been, nor to this day, is remotely true. Unless of course you consider standing on the backs of students as being on one’s “own two feet.”

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