The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

The Student News Site of Appalachian State University

The Appalachian

Newsletter Signup

Get our news delivered straight to your inbox every week.

* indicates required

OPINION: Thanksgiving etiquette 101

OPINION%3A+Thanksgiving+etiquette+101
Kaitlyn Close

Thanksgiving is meant to be a joyous time when families can come together to enjoy quality time with one another. Although the food might be delicious, a lot of times the dinner conversations can make someone lose their appetite. In order to dine and not cause a full out war among the family, there are a few key rules to follow:

#1 Forget politics

Now, regardless of if someone is right or left leaning, politics are not a good discussion topic. For those who believe that they would be alright because they are independent and would not have a strong urge to argue, stop lying to yourself. Everyone has an opinion and, nine times out of 10, that opinion will shine through in a heated debate. No need to bring up a political conversation that can and will become an issue with that one racist relative. A war at the dinner table does not need to exist while there is a perfectly cooked turkey waiting to be eaten. Everyone has the right to their own opinion, but sometimes those opinions are difficult to get out of the mouth respectfully, so do everyone a favor and steer clear from the conversation.

#2 Stop the degrading comments

This is not to have everyone going around complimenting every family member; instead it is to make sure people hold their tongue. A person’s body, job or life is not open for criticism or degrading comments. The passive aggressive statements and excessive nice talk around a touchy subject is unacceptable and unwarranted. Thanksgiving is meant for people to be grateful for what they have, not for making others long over the things they want. There are so many things in life that could be talked about, other than everything wrong with a particular person. It is also important to note that if the person can not fix it within the next five minutes, then it does not need to be addressed. This one rule can keep anyone from leaving Thanksgiving unhappy and reevaluating which family they married into or were born into. 

#3 Don’t be an instigator

The past two rules are relatively easy to follow as long as no one instigates those types of conversations. If you know that your aunt is getting a divorce for a third time, but no one else knows, do not bring up how happy everyone’s marriages are. It might be funny for the time being, but when someone threatens to never return to Thanksgiving dinner next year or to never talk to someone else, it might be time to reevaluate your decisions. Think ahead to how each family member will respond to a certain topic and if the reaction will be bad, avoid it. It is difficult to predict what others will do around the table and there could be another instigator in your midst, but keep your snide comments to yourself. If your cousin just moved in with their partner and your parents are talking about how unsmart that is, do not continue to bring up your cousin as an example. Allow your parents to get their thoughts out and move on. Do not keep that conversation going for longer than it needs to.

Leave a Comment
Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

We hope you appreciate this article! Before you move on, our student staff wanted to ask if you would consider supporting The Appalachian's award-winning journalism. We are celebrating our 90th anniversary of The Appalachian in 2024!

We receive funding from the university, which helps us to compensate our students for the work they do for The Appalachian. However, the bulk of our operational expenses — from printing and website hosting to training and entering our work into competitions — is dependent upon advertising revenue and donations. We cannot exist without the financial and educational support of our fellow departments on campus, our local and regional businesses, and donations of money and time from alumni, parents, subscribers and friends.

Our journalism is produced to serve the public interest, both on campus and within the community. From anywhere in the world, readers can access our paywall-free journalism, through our website, through our email newsletter, and through our social media channels. Our supporters help to keep us editorially independent, user-friendly, and accessible to everyone.

If you can, please consider supporting us with a financial gift from $10. We appreciate your consideration and support of student journalism at Appalachian State University. If you prefer to make a tax-deductible donation, or if you would prefer to make a recurring monthly gift, please give to The Appalachian Student News Fund through the university here: https://securelb.imodules.com/s/1727/cg20/form.aspx?sid=1727&gid=2&pgid=392&cid=1011&dids=418.15&bledit=1&sort=1.

About the Contributors
Bella Lantz
Bella Lantz, Associate Opinion Editor
Bella Lantz (she/her) is a sophomore secondary education-english major from Denver, NC.
Kaitlyn Close
Kaitlyn Close, Graphics Editor
Kaitlyn Close (she/her) is a senior Graphic Design major and Digital Marketing minor. This is her second year with The Appalachian.
Donate to The Appalachian
$1500
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Appalachian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *