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OPINION: AppalCart Etiquette 101

OPINION%3A+AppalCart+Etiquette+101
Chloe Pound

AppalCart is making it a tradition to confuse freshmen, frustrate the sophomores and make the upperclassmen shake their heads. However, with the many flaws, it is a useful and essential tool for those who do not have parking on campus or do not have cars. It has become increasingly unfavorable as the years go on due to the people riding the buses. The AppalCart system helps so many, if people would only follow a few simple rules:

#1 Stop Crowding

Everyone has a stop they need to get off at when riding the AppalCart, but quit standing right next to the doors. If people would stop crowding the door, others could see the empty spots that are in the back, which are waiting to be sat in. The door will be open for more than two seconds. Stop letting the back seats collect dust, because the buses do stop, that is what they are there to do. 

There are also two different doors, one to enter and one to exit. By crowding the front, the bus looks full and people are unable to get on, even though there is plenty of room in the back. Imagine waiting for the bus to come that entire time, only to see that it is full, and feel disappointed. Allow the bus to fill up.  

Do not be that person that makes everyone wait to get on the bus, because exiting through the front door looks more appealing. Move to the back of the bus, where you are meant to get out of the back door and enter through the front. There are so many people trying to get to many different places and the buses can get crowded; don’t be that person that makes someone late to class, because being by the door is a safer bet.

#2 Headphones have been invented

Ever have a bad morning, where peace feels out of reach, and get onto the AppalCart, knowing that it is the only time to breathe when heading to class? However, a loud TikTok coming from someone’s phone or someone on speakerphone screaming about the night before and all hope in a little peace before class is lost. Yes, many people have experienced this and there is such an easy solution, headphones. It’s the 21st century, it is okay for everyone not to know what is being talked about or listened to. As nosey as people can be, a whole movie, that no one else can watch, does not want to be heard on the buses. So, wear headphones and problem solved.

#3 Bus drivers are human

Now, for the people that are sitting here thinking “well I am only human, I can make mistakes,” so are the bus drivers. If the bus driver arrives early or late, they are only human. They cannot control the amount of traffic or where they can stop. Do not get snappy at them, because waking up last minute did not work out. Also, because they are human, be kind to them when entering and leaving the bus. Saying hello or thank you is such a small thing to do, yet it could make all the difference. 

The bus system is the best, yet the most infuriating thing, to ever enter Boone. It has almost become a ritual for freshmen to get lost while on the bus or live on the bus for the day. The bus system is underrated and overhated for many reasons, but the student population does not help. With more and more students using the buses, crowds along the sidewalk continuing to grow and space within buses continuing to shrink, it is important to keep in mind the rules of AppalCart.

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About the Contributor
Bella Lantz
Bella Lantz, Associate Opinion Editor
Bella Lantz (she/her) is a sophomore secondary education-english major from Denver, NC.
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    Donna ReillyOct 10, 2023 at 12:36 pm

    Excellent article. It always amazes me when a person has a call on speaker while riding the bus. Why? Just why? Nobody is interested in knowing your person business.

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