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Surviving Boone: Everything you need to know

View+of+the+Blue+Ridge+Mountains+from+Rough+Ridge.+July+21%2C+2023.
Briley Turpin
View of the Blue Ridge Mountains from Rough Ridge. July 21, 2023.

Each year, as summer comes to a close, Boone is flooded with people as students flock to the High Country, signifying the start of another semester at App State. Our little mountain town comes back to life as both new and returning students make their way to campus to settle into their homes in Boone. For some students, this is their first semester in Boone, which can be scary and intimidating. Moving to a new town isn’t easy for everyone, and it never hurts to have some tips and tricks up your sleeve to make the transition a little smoother. So, without further ado, here is your Boone survival guide, full of everything you need to know while living in Boone. 

The weather is never predictable.

Boone weather is all over the place. The sky can go from bright blue to dark and gloomy in a matter of minutes. Being prepared for all types of weather is essential when getting around town. A durable rain jacket is a must have while living in Boone. Unfortunately, sometimes just a rain jacket isn’t enough. On particularly rainy days, campus looks like a scene from “Mary Poppins,” with umbrellas as far as the eye can see. In the fall, it’s not uncommon for the temperature to change quickly. On days like this, layering is your best friend. Wearing clothes that are suitable for both 40 and 60 degrees can save you from discomfort as you make your way from class to class. 

Don’t expect class to be canceled when it snows.

 On the topic of weather, Boone is no stranger to winter weather. The area is home to three ski resorts, and the winters are known to be harsh. That being said, snow is common throughout the winter months. For many people raised in the south, a light dusting of snow usually guarantees the day off from school. In Boone, that simply isn’t the case. The university closes in cases of severe inclement weather, as stated on the website, but it isn’t uncommon for students to head to class with snow on the ground. 

It’s normal to see people walking around barefoot…even in the winter. 

Everyone knows the old saying “no shirt, no shoes, no service.” In Boone, it seems the shoes have been left out of the equation. It is incredibly common to stumble upon people walking around without their shoes. This is a controversial topic in Boone. Some people are in full support, and others not so much. Be prepared to have class with someone who isn’t wearing shoes at least once during your time at App State. 

People want to be outside. Can you blame them?

The High Country is a beautiful place to live and is chock-full of plenty of outdoor activities. People want to spend their time in the great outdoors, so be prepared to become one with nature. In the warmer months, hiking and camping are extremely popular pastimes. Students flock to Sanford Mall to lay in the sun or throw a football. Some students set up their slacklines, an activity that involves wrapping ratchet straps around two trees to create a tightrope. In the winter, many students spend their free time skiing and snowboarding. Nature is one of the things that brings the people of Boone together regardless of any differences they may have. 

Cables along Grandfather Mountain hike. July 21, 2023. (Briley Turpin )

Uber isn’t really a thing in Boone. 

In a college town, it’s important to know how to safely get around after a night of drinking. For most of the U.S., Uber and Lyft are reliable, safe options for transportation. While there are some rideshare drivers available in Boone, the most reliable option is called “beeping.” Instead of calling an Uber, students will get a “beep.” Beeping is essentially the same as riding in an Uber or Lyft, but rather than just anybody driving, beeps are typically App State students who are trying to make some money and are often cheaper than a rideshare app. Lists of people actively beeping each night can be found in the Boone Student Beeper Facebook group. Beeping is not without risk, so always make sure you feel comfortable with both drivers and passengers before beeping anywhere. 

Live music is prolific in Boone. 

The live music scene in Boone is a booming community. Not only is Boone home to a plethora of local bands, some composed of App State students, but the town also brings in several big-name artists each year. Most bars and restaurants in town have live music at least once each week. It’s not difficult to find a show most nights of the week, and new bands pop up all the time. 

Roess Dining Hall is always referred to as Central. 

Roess Dining Hall is the main dining hall on campus. Located in the center of campus, the dining hall is a popular place to grab a bite during a busy day. Despite the name on the front of the building, the dining hall is known to students as Central, the original name of the building. In 2014, the dining hall was renamed after Alice Roess, a former member of the App State board of trustees. Despite the name change, students never caught on, and the building has held on to its original name in casual conversation. So, if anyone asks if you want to grab some food at Central, they’re referring to Roess Dining Hall. 

The Blue Ridge Parkway is a go-to hangout spot. 

Located roughly 10 minutes from campus, the Blue Ridge Parkway is a popular hangout spot for many students at App State. The parkway has several access points for hiking, kayaking and camping, as well as many popular overlooks, such as the Thunder Hill Overlook. Students can often be found driving along the parkway or having picnics at the overlook. When exams get stressful, people head to the parkway to de-stress with a beautiful mountain view. Sunset and sunrise at the parkway are a must-see during your time at App State, so make sure to load up the car with your friends and hit the parkway before your time in Boone is over. 

Make friends. 

Although App State has a large student body, Boone is a small town. This comes in handy when making new friends. College provides students with a unique opportunity to meet people in a way that doesn’t really happen in the real world. Befriend the people in your dorm, talk to everyone you sit next to in class and don’t be afraid to talk to new people. College can be a challenging time, but having a good support system can make it much easier. Being surrounded by 20,000 of your peers can make you feel small, but just remember everyone at App State has been there at some point or another. 

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About the Contributor
Briley Turpin
Briley Turpin, A&C Editor
Briley Turpin (she/her) is a senior communications major with a criminal justice minor.
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